Week 2

Part 1 -Australia in the Asian Century -summary

How does the Paper impact your understanding of Design in Asia and your role/opportunity as a designer?

In response to Australia In The Asian Century, i feel as though it is a very exciting time to be neighbouring countries to some of the leading distributers and manufacturers in the world. What else is exciting is the emerging countries such as India, South Korea and other developing contenders. China has always been known as the largest and cheapest place to go for manufacturing which is great for Australian business on a large scale, but what worries me is the future of small time business that are being forced to look over seas for manufacture when they are only producing small amounts of units, environmentally this is also a little concerning in regards to the transport of goods. On a positive note, being apart of this growing continent is a very exciting time in regards to developing on a world scale, the growing amount of designers and institutions that will be popping up over the next few years will be exponential, which in tern will produce some great minds and some amazing advancement.

Part 2 Four asian based designs

Sori Yanagi http://www.soriyanagi.com/uk/start.php Butterfly stool 1956 molded plywood and metal  manufacturer Tendo co Tokyo The Design concept was to replicate the flowing movement of a butterfly. Its calligraphic elegance, however, suggests a distinctly Asian sensibility combines japanese aesthetic with moulded plywood, an industrial woodworking technique developed by american designers Charles and Ray Eames
Sori Yanagi http://www.soriyanagi.com/uk/start.php
Butterfly stool 1956
molded plywood and metal
manufacturer Tendo co Tokyo
The Design concept was to replicate the flowing movement of a butterfly. Its calligraphic elegance, however, suggests a distinctly Asian sensibility
combines japanese aesthetic with moulded plywood, an industrial woodworking technique developed by american designers Charles and Ray Eames
Kenji Ekuan http://www.gk-design.co.jp/en/ekuan.html Gk design group Kikkoman Soy Sauce Dispenser, 1961 Glass and polystyrene  manufacturer: Kikkoman corp japan Kenji Ekuan’s Soy Sauce Dispenser is a brilliant example of tying links between traditional Japanese aesthetics and contemporary design. When Kenji Ekuan started designing his Soy Sauce Dispenser he wanted to create something beautiful out of the most stagnant object he could find, something that was an every day item that had not been considered as something that could be beautiful.
Kenji Ekuan http://www.gk-design.co.jp/en/ekuan.html
Gk design group
Kikkoman Soy Sauce Dispenser, 1961
Glass and polystyrene
manufacturer: Kikkoman corp japan
Kenji Ekuan’s Soy Sauce Dispenser is a brilliant example of tying links between traditional Japanese aesthetics and contemporary design. When Kenji Ekuan started designing his Soy Sauce Dispenser he wanted to create something beautiful out of the most stagnant object he could find, something that was an every day item that had not been considered as something that could be beautiful.
Reiko Tanabe and Isamu Noguchi Stool, 1961 Moulded plywood with teak veneer manufacturer: tendo Mokko, Yamagata- Ken, japan Together the artist and designer created ‘Stool’, a piece of bamboo furniture that became internationally recognised  as an icon of modern Japanese design. Although the item is constructed through traditional Japanese basket weaving, its aesthetics are influenced heavily by western furniture design. This piece displays the unity ofJapanese traditional manufacturing methods, and western modernist furniture design, whereby at the time defined Japanese modern design.
Reiko Tanabe and Isamu Noguchi
Stool, 1961
Moulded plywood with teak veneer
manufacturer: tendo Mokko, Yamagata- Ken, japan
Together the artist and designer created ‘Stool’, a piece of bamboo furniture that became internationally recognised as an icon of modern Japanese design.
Although the item is constructed through traditional Japanese basket weaving, its aesthetics are influenced heavily by western furniture design.
This piece displays the unity ofJapanese traditional manufacturing methods, and western modernist furniture design, whereby at the time defined Japanese modern design.

 

Hiroaki Kozu Speakers model YST-SD90 1989 Fabric, rubber, wood and painted Nextel finish Manufacturer: yamaha corp, Hamamatsu, Japan The design rational for this design was to cross the boundary between fashion and product design
Hiroaki Kozu
Speakers model YST-SD90
1989
Fabric, rubber, wood and painted Nextel finish
Manufacturer: yamaha corp, Hamamatsu, Japan
The design rational for this design was to cross the boundary between fashion and product design

 

Hiroaki Kozu Speakers model YST-SD90 1989 Fabric, rubber, wood and painted Nextel finish Manufacturer: yamaha corp, Hamamatsu, Japan The design rational for this design was to cross the boundary between fashion and product design
Hiroaki Kozu
Speakers model YST-SD90
1989
Fabric, rubber, wood and painted Nextel finish
Manufacturer: yamaha corp, Hamamatsu, Japan
The design rational for this design was to cross the boundary between fashion and product design

 

Part 3

Armchair Ming Dynasty 17th Century China rosewood (huanghuali0, cane This arm chair showed some amazing detail in wood joinery and a beautiful curved back rest that is so incredibly modern for its time.
Armchair
Ming Dynasty 17th Century China
rosewood (huanghuali0, cane
This arm chair showed some amazing detail in wood joinery and a beautiful curved back rest that is so incredibly modern for its time.

 

6th century - 7th century AD, Iran  copper alloy, Zinc The Sassanian Empire stretched from Syria to north-west India and bridged the cultures of Europe and Asia. This ewer combines Hellenistic and Perian elements that characterise the art of Iran prior to the islamic conquests of Persia. The naturalism of the dancing figures, fluidity of drapery and hair, and the architecture framing derive from imagery of the classical world
6th century – 7th century AD, Iran
copper alloy, Zinc
The Sassanian Empire stretched from Syria to north-west India and bridged the cultures of Europe and Asia. This ewer combines Hellenistic and Perian elements that characterise the art of Iran prior to the islamic conquests of Persia. The naturalism of the dancing figures, fluidity of drapery and hair, and the architecture framing derive from imagery of the classical world.
I Wayan Kayung, attributes to Balinese 1878-1956 Opaque watercolour on cotton. The painting depicts a scene from the Javanese epic court poem, bhomantaka in which Kresna (krishna) the hindu god and avatar of wisnu (vishnu), defeats the demon Bhoma.
I Wayan Kayung, attributes to Balinese 1878-1956
Opaque watercolour on cotton.
The painting depicts a scene from the Javanese epic court poem, bhomantaka in which Kresna (krishna) the hindu god and avatar of wisnu (vishnu), defeats the demon Bhoma.
Chinese  Chair Qing dynasty 18th century China, lacquer on wood. Lacquer is a remarkable natuarl substance derived from the sap of Rhus verniciflua tree. The carved lacquer technique is considered the supreme achievement of Chinese lacquer. The chair is decorated with scenes of the birthday celebration of the Queen Mother of the west Xiwangmu.
Chinese
Chair
Qing dynasty 18th century China, lacquer on wood.
Lacquer is a remarkable natuarl substance derived from the sap of Rhus verniciflua tree. The carved lacquer technique is considered the supreme achievement of Chinese lacquer.
The chair is decorated with scenes of the birthday celebration of the Queen Mother of the west Xiwangmu.

 

Chinese semi formal court robe late 19th century china silk, silk and metallic thread, gilt. This is a fine example of a dragon robe worn by a scholar official on semi formal occasions. Its design is derived from the riding coat of the Manchu rulers.
Chinese
semi formal court robe
late 19th century china silk, silk and metallic thread, gilt.
This is a fine example of a dragon robe worn by a scholar official on semi formal occasions. Its design is derived from the riding coat of the Manchu rulers.

 

 

 

 

 

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